Delerium

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Delerium

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As the musical zeitgeist slips further into an obsession with easily digestible singles and online statistics, options become increasingly limited for those in search of deep albums. Originally conceived as a side project of legendary Front Line Assembly in 1987, Delerium has consistently transfixed listeners worldwide with its inimitable blend of sounds. With Bill Leeb (creator/brainchild of Delerium, Front Line Assembly and Skinny Puppy) at the helm, the Vancouver electronic outfit - which includes collaborators Rhys Fulber, Jared Slingerland and Jeremy Inkel - fuses ambient and cinematic production with soaring vocals courtesy of a myriad of guests.
 
As a member of industrial rock outfits Skinny Puppy and aforementioned Front Line Assembly, Leeb has sold over 3 million units worldwide throughout his career; including over a million albums in North America with Delerium. However, Delerium step up with the most intriguing, intricate, and infectious offering to date - Music Box Opera.
 
While Delerium’s musical style encompasses a broad range - trance, world music, ambient and electronic pop music - the music always highlights a strong female vocalist. In the past, Delerium has worked with Leigh Nash, Miranda Lee Richards, Butterfly Boucher, Emily Haines (of Metric) and the most commercially successful single, “Silence,” featured Sarah McLachlan.
 
Appearing on the 1997 breakthrough Karma, “Silence” not only figured prominently in the film Brokedown Palace, but it's also been remixed by the likes of Tiësto. It's considered a landmark for trance and still pipes through clubs globally today.
 
"Music Box Opera is more of an electronic record than a world music record. It's ethereal, but there's a little bit of pop. We tried to intertwine and merge those two strands. The singers really held this up. The last album was more dark and worldly. Previously, I'd use acoustic guitars and real drummers. We really went electronic here and stuck to that vibe though,” explains Leeb.
 
Ultimately, on Music Box Opera, everything cascades in unison for an entire vision that's worth immersing yourself in.